Whadya Think?

032B7637-1B47-4214-BBD5-68D335398F80DD9D3175-3636-47D9-998F-70D4BB95160FA huge shout out to Dorothy at Dorothy’s Colorado Art.  She and her husband Russ are off-gridders across the mountains from us.  We mentioned that we were looking for a new logo for the farm and Dorothy put this together for us.  If we ever do a booth at a craft fair or farmer’s market we need a banner of some sort.  Plus, we wanted something for T-shirts and hats.  Now to find a place to get them printed up when she sends us the file.  We really like them!  Thanks Dorothy!  You’re awesome!  Check out their energetic videos at Happy Off Grid on You Tube.

 

 

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Went and Bought Some Help…. Happy Birthday To The Grumpy Old Farmer!

 

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We broke down and bought a helper for the old farmer butts.  If you’ve ever worked on a building project in your mid-50’s, forgot a tool and said tool is in the shop a quarter mile round trip away (especially if it happens more than once), you will understand the need completely.  Hauling straw and hay and 50 pound feed bags will now not seem so torturous.  I’ve heard slavery is illegal, so we went with this instead. Happy Birthday to the grumpy old farmer with the fused spine!

Our son has my old little running around car up at college.  He needs it to get back and forth to his lab job.  As a result, dear old dad just has his ginormous pick up truck that we try to only use for hauling and towing needs.  It is hugely uneconomical for going to the grocery store.  So we have taken to having me go into the city with Zina on Fridays, when needed, to do the necessary hunting and gathering.  This keeps the truck parked.  I’d like this to be one of the last gargantuan trucks we ever need.

But, that means I am pretty much sequestered on the farm alone most of the week.  It can get pretty quiet out here in the sticks, and while I don’t really care about a lot of company, sometimes I just need OUT for awhile.  So in addition to it being a work horse (It’s a 700 and has some serious guts) I will be able to use it to tool around the farm, which has a mile perimeter.  Also on occasion, I will be putting it on the trailer and taking it up to an area where we used to own some property and tool around on fire roads and national forest trails.  My hunting days are pretty well done, but I’m eager to take the camera and zoom lenses up and just run around in the hills.

So far we have been hauling 50 lb. sacks of feed and innumerable straw and hay bails by hand with wagons.  If you put 6 bags of pig feed on a utility wagon, you are in for some pretty good resistance training.  With this beastie, it will be considerably less work and we have certainly earned something of a reprieve.  Even taking out the trash here is a quarter of a mile round trip.  I can’t begin to tell you how much “project time” has been wasted by having to walk around getting things.  While its not a horse and it does burn gas, we think its for a good cause:  growing our own food, saving our knee joints, and having some fun!  Of course, when you are a couple of finance geeks, we even figured out how to cut enough fluff out of the current budget to keep it cashflow neutral… after all, if someone else’s money is cheap, use it and keep yours!  Now if I can just get it off the truck without flipping it over!

 

The Days Are Shortening, Time To Look Back On The Year

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We’ve noticed of late that we can go out earlier in the evening to put the chickens to bed and the sun is coming up later in the morning.  Being someone that really has his clock aligned with the sun cycle, it means a bit more sleep (Don’t fool yourself, I’m still starting to wake up before 4 am.).

But with the change of season (Today is 91. What change of season? – oh ya, the season we used to have before we screwed everything up), it is time to look back on the farm and assess the damage.  More and more we are becoming creatures of farm routine instead of construction engineers.  We declared an end to the expansion of the farm and have found that we are really at the limits of what two old farts can expect to accomplish (especially when one is only here half the week and needs to re-coup from the week at the “money and health care job”).  Every fall, we take a step back and survey all that we can survey and assess how things went and where we are headed.

The first assessment is owning up to our physical limits.  While we can still work most city folk under the hay bunk who are half our age, since adding quite a bit of livestock to the mix, it is an unrelenting schedule.  My back is doing great, but I have to watch how I bend (which makes hay stacking an adventure).  While the pain is gone from the spinal issues, they didn’t put me back together according to the factory specs.  I am never not stiff and sore.  From my neck to my calves, I have to stretch out every day and give myself a bit of time to get it all moving in one direction.  Zina has increasing responsibilities at work, so there has to be something of a balance between doing some chores, but also being able to simply “be” with the critters (Something we have come to call, Farm TV).  What we have learned this past season, is that the most important farm implements, the humans, have been tested to their limits and adding anything more would probably become something of a health hazard.  After all, if you consider that pre-civil war homesteaders lived about 50 years we are pretty long in the tooth.  We STARTED this place at 50.  Of course, we were urban farmers long before this, but the farm started on 12/4 of 2012.  We are coming up on 7 years of an unbelievable amount of work, both in its building and production.  If we do say so ourselves, we are some tough old birds.

So with that admission, the adding of anything new to the place that expands beyond what we are doing, won’t happen.  We had considered other livestock and such, but we already raise about 85% of all we consume.  There isn’t a lot left to consider unless we wanted some giraffes and kangaroos!  Any new projects will be enhancements of what we already have;  Things that come up that make you say, “You know what would really make this work well…..”  For instance, now that we have jumped into the dairy goat world, we discovered that we don’t really have a good place to milk.  The barn has a dirt floor and is pretty dusty.  So we may get another shed, just like the one we just got for the bucks, to use as a milking parlor.  We don’t milk the old fashioned way by squeezing.  We use a hand held milker.  That does keep the milk cleaner, but having the ladies in a dedicated area, along with our goat gear, makes a lot of sense.  So those kinds of enhancement things will continue.

The farm is a multi-faceted operation.  It is simply not possible to keep the schedule of “have to’s” in one’s head and hope to remain sane.  We have, and are, developing a yearly calendar that has all the reoccurring tasks in it; from goat vaccines, to coop cleaning, house cleaning, animal feeding, etc.  We’ve found that if we don’t do that, our minds stack everything up in front of us like a mountain and it is easy to get discouraged.  I suffer from Complex PTSD and anxiety ramps up pretty quickly when things look overwhelming.  We need to eat this elephant one bite at a time.  If our time is managed well, the anxiety is reduced significantly.

So then, How’d we do.  Overall 2019 GPA:  A  (Last year would have been a C)

The first goal was to have enough of the build out done so that we could focus on our gardens in ways we hadn’t been able to do before.  We were constantly splitting our time between making and building things and trying to stay ahead of the weeds in the old garden.  This year was a splendid success.  The move away from the hilled gardens to the boxed raised beds around the greenhouse was just the ticket.  While we weren’t able to really be intentional about it’s tending like we’d hoped, it was certainly better than in years past (surgery years not withstanding).  I worked like a madman to get the remaining 9 raised beds, hail guards and shade cloth covers up (I will be making 5 more this winter to finish them all off).  Last September around this time, we had water hydrants attached to the well and run to the greenhouse and to the barn.  This overcame yet another drought this year.  The high pressure was able to bring drip irrigation and provide hand watering to all 40 raised beds.  The spring started off cold and wet, which set things back about a month, then it all dried out.  Our temperatures were easily as hot as the drought from last year, but the shade cloth kept the plants from getting scalded in the mile-hi plains.  The hail guards did their job as well.  So unless we move into the 100’s for temperatures next year (a definite possibility), we have the vegetable gardens in a pretty good place.  I have planted Broccoli, Cauliflower, lettuce and spinach for the fall planting and once the tomatoes give it up in the greenhouse when we get our first freeze, I will be getting the cooler weather loving things going out there.  Shameless self-adulation:  I’m a damned good gardener.

Evaluation of the gardens:  Excellent.  Only the Tomatillos failed, but they have been particularly difficult to raise here for years (The grasshoppers love ’em) .  Everything has produced extremely well.  We had our first bout of white flies and tomato horned worms in the greenhouse, but we won the battle (tomato worms are disgusting creatures). The garden has done so well that we are crying uncle.  Next year:  No hard beans.  We have mountains of them and the beds can be put to better use.  You have to grow huge amounts of black beans to get enough to care about.  Probably going to punt on the Tomatillos.  We’ll rotate the tomatoes to the outdoor beds.  We need to get the cool season stuff in earlier in the spring and start the warm weather stuff later.  Try some melons.  Create cattle panel arches for the vining plants.  Foot long beans look interesting.  Grow more Shallots, they are great.  Keep doing celery.  Trust the seeder when planting carrots.  The carrots did great but they are way overcrowded.  Stay on the weeding to the neglect of everything else except the animals.  I cannot believe how prolific the bindweed is here.  They strangle everything.  More sunflowers.  Put in a long raised bed for potatoes and create a dedicated asparagus patch.

Construction to enhance:  Build the permanent fence around the gardens, string drip lines to the apple trees, finish the remaining hail guards, and build the potato, corn and asparagus beds.

Livestock:  We are officially turkey and dairy goat ranchers.  They were the new additions here.  On the bird side, we have begun hatching all of our own chickens and turkeys.  If you have never had a home raised turkey, boy oh boy are you missing out;  Absolutely incredible taste.  We are also hatching and raising Jersey Giants as our meat chicken flock as well as a smaller bunch of Cornish cross “Frankenbirds” in the spring.  We added grow out coops this year and moved the brooders to the barn so we don’t have to have the dust that baby chicks create, inside our home anymore.  All of this has gone great.  The only issue we have had to contend with is that turkeys are Stooooooooooopid!!  Chickens put themselves to bed at night, turkeys couldn’t find their tail feathers with a detailed map.  They like to roost up high so even clipping their flight feathers isn’t completely helpful.  The teenagers have figured out how to jump over to the breeder stock coop and that finds themselves getting their asses kicked by the adults. I mean KICKED!  Like dead.  I guess, if we had to evaluate the turkey flock as a meat source, it would be to hatch a bit fewer and process them sooner.  It is certainly worth the time, but as we speak I’d love to just take my shotgun and …….    Turkeys is dumb, Mkay?

We bred our little Ginger (Nigerian Dwarf Goat) this year.  That has been so much fun.  There is nothing cuter than baby farm animals.  As I write, it appears that one of our other does, Cumin, is pregnant.  We put her in with Tank, one of our bucks, and it was quite the courtship.  All of about 5 minutes.  I think we timed things correctly.

Ginger gave birth to Switch and Neo.  We have been using Matrix names for the boys.  Our intact bucks are Tank and Dozer (Also, Switch, because we first thought he was a she… nope…. two boys).  Now as sad as it is, bucks, like roosters, are not needed in quantity.  We have absolutely no need for two more stinky, crazy, breed-able boys.  So instead of simply doing away with them (They are our firsts, so of course we couldn’t just drown them), we will be turning them into Wethers (castrated males) and they will spend their lives with the girls.

Which leads me to the next point: Enough having to download more cranial software.  You’ve heard the canard, “It’s all a learning experience”, or “Learning is a life long process….”  all that New Age tripe.  I am tired of having to download new software into my head!  We are virtually all self-taught!  I want to have life be kind of routine for awhile.  Once those babies were born, it was a flurry of activity in trying to figure out what needed to be done.  Sure, as usual, we read everything there was, but its a whole ‘nuther thing to have them in your midst.  When do you de-horn?  What’s the best way to vaccinate?  Is momma supposed to be milked once or twice a day?  What do you do with the milk?  If I drink it will I die?  Whew!  The babies are still alive this morning, must not have screwed up too badly…..  Enough!  Now that they are going on 3 weeks old, we’ve pretty much got this wired, and, of course, if you just shut up and observe, you find out that momma goat has already got a lot of this figured out.  Observation breeds answers in most cases.

Evaluation of Livestock:  Raising goats is way fun.  Like being a first time parent, the unknowns are becoming known.  Considering that we have been raising other livestock for years and that I have experience being around cattle, we probably should have cut ourselves some slack.  We are looking forward to goat’s milk soap, and tasty cheese, and milk for our coffee.

The turkeys are a great success.  They aren’t my favorite animal, but considering that we don’t eat a lot of beef, ground turkey for meat and sausage does the trick (and they don’t weigh 1200 lbs).  Not to mention the fact that a roasted, home hatched and home grown Tom is about the best thing around.

We will be reducing our chicken egg laying flock. We are giving dozens of eggs away and it simply isn’t necessary.  We will hatch any replacements as the older hens get beyond their laying years (and the elders will become soup).  Also, the Jersey Giants are a heritage breed so they will also be laying eggs (and turkey eggs are huge and taste just like chicken eggs). We apparently have the butt nugget area covered pretty well

Meat birds.  Between the Jerseys and the Cornish Crosses we will proceed as usual.  We’ve got that wired too.

Pigs.  We will either keep buying gilts and barrows in the spring, or we may switch to breeds like Kunekunes or American Guinea Hogs.  If we want to breed them instead of relying on someone else to do it, I cannot handle an 800 lb. boar and a mad momma of comparable size any more.  Pigs are awesome.  They are smart, playful and friendly.  However, they are the size of a Buick and even if they didn’t intend to hurt you they certainly can.  We’ve taken to taking a cattle prod out with us when we interact with them. They love to come and rub on you.  They are currently as big as me and can upend you for no reason and then accidentally stomp on you while they run out of the way (I’ve seen them do it to each other…. not conducive to a human chassis).  Pound for pound a hog is probably the strongest animal you can have on a farm.  With the other breeds mentioned above, they are about half the size and a lot more docile.  So it remains to be seen which direction we head.  Again, we already have the infrastructure.  Its not a project that will  “add to” the farm.  More, its how best to move forward given all the above and what makes sense. Stay tuned.

Goats:  I’m all in.  Now that we know how to handle the husbandry issues, these little folk are about as sweet as they get.  And wow!  We eliminate another couple of staple items from the store: Soap and cheese.

Donkeys:  What can I say?  They are the Zen masters of the farm. We love them to pieces. I’d have a whole ranch full of them if we could swing it.  They are very old, wise, souls.

Looking Forward:

Our number one goal is to live with the place and just putz and have a routine.  This is a tough way to live, but now that the construction is on a “want to” instead of “have to” level, we can putz around as we choose.  Putting the gardens and the livestock at the forefront, as well as our personal enjoyment, is goal number one.

What would I like to work on?

  1.  Put the permanent fence around the gardens and get the remaining hail guards and beds built.
  2. If there is anything I would go into debt for (we don’t have any), it would be a solar hot water heater, a wood burning stove and a metal roof.  I hate the idea that we are dependent upon a guy and a truck to bring in propane.  Hail reduces 30 year shingles to 7.  While we are technically considered “off grid” I could virtually eliminate our propane bill just by heating water with the sun.
  3. I am looking into a gizmo called a “Cool-Bot”.  It takes a regular window mounted air conditioner and lets you use it as the cooling unit for a walk-in refrigerated room.  While we don’t need it to be refrigerator level cold, our “root-cellar”/ pantry in the basement still gets too warm in these scorching summers.  If I can insulate the room and use this gizmo, it will further our food storage capacity immensely.
  4. New shed for a milking parlor.
  5. Weave more.  Because of the farm schedule, I’ve not done much this summer.  Also, I was planning on having a booth at a local craft show for Christmas this year.  There is no way I’ll be ready for that.  Next year.  That is my art.  I’d love to see Zina get back at her quilting and needlepoint as well.  Oh ya, get my telescope out.  I miss my stars.
  6. Get the water catchment system up and running.  Almost there, just need to finish it up.
  7. Keep doing the vermi-composting and get the bio-char burners built so we can further develop our on site fertilizer operations

The only expansion (that’s not an expansion):

We operate this place roughly via Permaculture principles.  Everything is based on zones and everything eventually is supposed to bring in or create more than it cost.  So there are two areas that will be addressed (one will take years).

The first is to plant more trees.  We have locust trees down our southern border.  I’m going to be taking some of the seed pods and grow a bunch and plant them down our drive way and other places to serve as wind and snow breaks.

The second is to create a “food forest”.  For details do a search engine for it, but suffice it to say that it will be put into the old garden.  It will be a combination of fruit and nut trees, berry bushes and vines, ground covers and pollinator plants, all designed to create a huge area that keeps producing food annually, increases wildlife, supports bees, and feeds us, all in balance with itself.

I have a line on some roofing steel and will begin to create a “roof” or lean-to that will allow me to divert water from that structure (about 1000 square feet) into ponds and irrigation drains that will feed some of the water needs of this food forest creation.  This will kind of be my canvas to paint on.  I’ve seen some in Colorado and it can indeed be done.  However, given the decrepitude of my old farmer butt, it will be a long term work in progress….. I guess, as it should be.

My ultimate goal anymore, is that no matter what the coming climate catastrophe may bring, it is to work according to what I see as “right action”.  I want this forty acres to know that I tried my damnedest to heal it and live with it.  It will ultimately fail, but that is what I know to be right and the only thing I really care about.  When the universe folds up on this minuscule part of itself, I’ll be damned if I go down with a legacy that I was just smacking a white pebble down green grass in stupid clothes consuming everything and serving no purpose.

So the JAZ Farm flourished this year; partly because the weather was more cooperative, but mostly because we improvised, adapted and overcame.  It’s always an adventure and I would suspect there are surprises lurking in the shadows as well as we progress into our 7th year.  What a long strange trip it has been.  Stay tuned.

Club Nigerian Bucks, No Girls Allowed

As I mentioned when we were going through the “Bomb Cyclone” this past winter, all of our animals were fine except our little bucklings.  All they had to hunker down in was a corrugated steel hog hut.  Even with it facing away from the prevailing wind, it still swirled around because of the severe wind speeds and went into the entrance and made them very cold.  They had icicles on their fur and were so happy when we brought out towels to help dry them off.  It hurt my heart to see them.

I was very determined to ensure that that wouldn’t happen again.  Tuff Sheds were stupid expensive.  While out to dinner one evening, we noticed that a lot in the next town over had sheds.  So the next day I went in and inquired.  The company is Cumberland Sheds and are built here in Colorado.  They seem sturdy and given the price, I couldn’t build it for any less.

Hurray! Today was delivery day.  They had this gizmo called a “Shed Mule”.  They slid it off the trailer, hooked it up and moved it right into place.  We were even able to keep it true to the farm colors: Cream and Forest Green.  So tomorrow, I need to head up to the feed store and get some stall mats for the floor so the boys don’t stink it up and have the wood floor rot.

This little hut is 8 x 12.  It has a ton of room for a passel of goats plus their hay.  So one more building on the farm.  I have just resigned myself to “that’s what it takes”. After all, one of the bucks is the daddy of our two new babies!  I think I have found my favorite farm animal, Nigerian Dwarf Goats.  They are irritating, get into everything, have no sense of personal space ESPECIALLY when you have treats and are the sweetest little shits around!  The babies are doing great.  Ginger is being an awesome momma and in one more week, we get to start milking.

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Colorado Government Finally Did Something Right

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>> The photo shown here ^^^ isn’t the completed gizmo but it shows the gist of how it will work<<

I’ve lived in the west for over half my life.  I have never understood why, in a place where droughts can cause water restrictions, that they didn’t allow for rainwater catchment.  In fact, it has been illegal.  I understand that it comes from the complexities of historical water rights (first in time, first in right), but most here would agree with me as to just how ridiculous this is – especially when the real spike in urban/suburban water use goes up in the summer so lawns can be watered.

Recently, the laws changed for the better.  From what I read, if you are on a municipal system (we are not) it is now legal to trap up to 2, 55 gallon rain barrels of rain and snow as long as it is used externally.  If you are on a well or off the grid from a water stand point, the amount you can use indoors and out is now unlimited as long as it comes off of a roof (I think an outdoor solar shower would be awesome!).

Yours truly, Mr. Farmer Jon, jumped at the chance.  Today, after putting it off for other projects this summer, I finally got down to making the first flush system for our water catchment system.  The roof is 1680 square feet.  According to the calculator, 1 inch of rain will provide 1297 gallons of water.  That would fill the tank shown above to over-flow by 297 gallons.  Through the magic of PVC I will be daisy chaining other tanks into the system as we go.

There are a number of reasons why we want to do this.  1. We live in a semi-arid climate that only gets 13.5 inches of rain a year (snow increases this, but not by much).  2. We are on a well that is down into an aquifer.  If you know anything about aquifer depletion, the news isn’t all that rosy.  3. The well is 265 feet deep so manual pumps won’t work.  If the electric pump fails, having water stored above ground until the pump can be fixed is just prudent (Our solar system protects against the grid going down, but not if the pump fails).  4. The water here is VERY alkaline.  Rainwater is not.  I have a pressure tank and pump that will provide enough pressure to water the gardens and not salinate them.

The only issue is winter.  Water freezes in winter.  As a result, we will be putting a 500 gallon storage tank in our basement to hold water through the winter.  It will be our weakest time of year, but unless I can figure out how to keep the big tanks warm when it’s 12 degrees outside, there isn’t much choice.  An underground cistern would be ideal, but contrary to popular and familial belief, we are not among the 1%.

I should have it all plumbed, painted and functional tomorrow.  I can’t wait to see this thing work….. of course, now that it is in, we won’t have any rain.

So here’s how it works:  There is a rubber racket ball in the wider, longer tube.  When it rains, the first water that comes off the roof will be dusty and bird pooped.  As that water washes down, the first water goes into the tube.  The racket ball rises as the tube fills.  Once it gets up to the reducer, it plugs it and the the fresher water will divert over to the green tank and fill it.  At the bottom of the first flush is a screw-in drain cover.  That allows the dirty water to be drained out so as to set it up for the next rainfall.  It might not be big enough, but there will be another one just like it on the other side of the barn.  We will be able to trap thousands of gallons of water, even in our dry climate…. Brilliant!

They Are Finally Finished!!

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I’m getting better at my hemming.  They look less like a snake and more like a hand done project.

After looking up from my dreamland and discovering that Labor Day weekend is just a week away, I kind of freaked.  For fun, I want to set up a booth at our local holiday fair this year.  It will be to have a weaving presence.  If I don’t get my butt in gear I’ll not have anything to display!!  I want to sell some Christmas table runners, placemats and kitchen towels. But before I can loom them up I have a couple other orders to fill.  Deep breathing.  Whodah thunk that post retirement would be busier than pre?  If you think a couple can homestead and get everything done….. you are delusional.  I woke up this morning, thinking that I’d get in the garden and was met with a sick turkey.  Now that they have been de-wormed, its now 7:30 pm and I’m hemming napkins.  We are on goat baby watch, we have been canning and dehydrating, the wife is working a full time job, and I’m losing my mind.  All in a week’s schedule.  Of course….in the end, who owns this problem?

 

Farming and Hobbies Take Up A Lot Of Time

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So the lesson learned here (tongue in cheek) is that starting a huge weaving project at the same time as seedling starts in the early spring, does not yield quick results.

Tonight I finally got these napkins off the loom!!  I started them right around the time we bred one of our Nigerian Dwarf goats (1st part of April).  It was a warp of 14 yards (friggin huge).  Since that time we built new raised beds, all the hail covers, drip irrigation to the new beds, planted the entire garden, built two new grow out coops, hatched a flock of turkeys, raised and processed meat birds, got two more pigs, built an outdoor worm composting bin, got barrels to create biochar, fixed up a car to take to my kid, have a pregnant goat, hired a very part time farm hand, took care of the critters and the gardens, built new composting bins, built a dog house, dealt with a goat that contracted pinkeye, Zina spent a week in Detroit helping her family out and we still tried to have a little down time. It is now the end of July and the napkins finally came off the loom.  There are 15 of them.  They are about 22×22 inches which makes them the size of a napkin that you would get at a 4 or 5 star restaurant.  They still have to be pre-washed and hemmed but I’m very pleased with the end result.  I have been trying to make extras of patterns I weave so as to build some inventory.  I have half a mind to set up a little booth for the holidays at our local rec center.  No weavers there, so maybe I’d get lucky.  If we keep six for ourselves that means I have two, 4 napkin sets to sell that will go with the table runners and placemats of the same color.  Whadya think?  Will I get Jeff Bezos rich?  How about I just be happy to cover my yarn costs so my hobby pays for itself.  Ya we’ll go with that.  Homesteading ain’t for wimps.