The Pantry Is Filling Up Despite The Drought!

We had a terrible gardening season.  The drought and the excessive heat (because we all know there isn’t any global warming – idiots) totally destroyed our hard bean, carrot, tomato, pepper, potato, melon and squash plants.  We did get green beans, a few tomatoes, lots of cucumbers, basil, egg plant, sweet potatoes and celery.  Our garlic was great but that is because it is planted before the hottest time of the year.  The onions were on their way and then got wiped out in a hail storm.  So all in all it was pretty sad.  We produce tons of food and this year we kind of watched helplessly as it all withered in the heat and sun.

So as always, the problem solving had to start.  We are in the process of putting up hail guards and sunblock netting over the gardens by the greenhouse.  We may begin converting the big garden to more trees and berries.  If these crazy heat waves continue (Which NOAA says will continue until at least 2022 – and I think will continue well beyond) we will be continually learning how to improvise, adapt and overcome until we simply can’t.

I am in the midst of canning as usual though.  Our goal is to have a couple of years of just canned food in the pantry that we can rotate in order to keep current.  We are on our way and we probably have close to that amount of food (not all canned) if you take into consideration the 2 pigs and 40 chickens in the freezer, the never ending re-supply of chicken butt nuggets every day for breakfast, a flock of turkeys,  and the individual items that we have canned like carrots and beans, etc and the hundreds of pounds of pasta, dry beans, wheat berries, and oats we have in storage buckets.

We were lamenting the fact that the tomato harvest was a disaster.  We got a couple of gallons of sauce made but not nearly the same was the hundreds of pounds we usually get.  Low and behold though, we had a source to get some cheap!  Zina has a relationship with a food bank near her office.  In the past month they had an open house for their donors so they had a lot of excess that they couldn’t give away (probably because of food safety issues).  It was still good though, they simply couldn’t use it.  Usually, Zina picks up the waste to bring out for us to compost.  This goes to the critters and also to fertilize the gardens (We have fed our pigs loaves and loaves of left over bread from them over the years).  But this time she came home with about 40 lbs of Roma tomatoes and probably close to 50 lbs of potatoes!  The tomatoes were tasteless, but when combined with ours, it made a pretty good sauce.  I had already purchased about 30 lbs of potatoes so we combined them with the food pantry potatoes and spent all day yesterday canning 40 quarts of potatoes!  Brilliant!  So in the last couple of days we have canned over 68 quarts bringing this fall’s canning production well over 100 so far.

Next up is more split pea soup, white bean and ham soup, black bean chili, baked beans, chicken soup, and whatever other canned meals I can dream up.  So despite it all, the pantry is staying stocked.  Food self-sufficiency folks.  Get after it.  Even if it is just canned goods from Costco.  The prices will never go down, and…. well…. ex-financial advisor here…. the next crash on the horizon will make 2008 look like a ride at Disney.  Plus the food tastes better and is better for you.  Sorry.  It’ll make you have to do something else other than work on your short game at the country club though.  Bummer.

Two is one and One is none:

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The Latest In Our Broken Food World

http://farmandranchfreedom.org/gmo-harms-reproductive-and-digestive-health/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-gunther/industry-assurances-over-_b_4039594.html?utm_hp_ref=@food123

http://www.examiner.com/slideshow/bt-corn-and-intestinal-disorders#slide=1

http://gmoseralini.org/seralini-validated-by-new-efsa-guidelines-on-long-term-gmo-experiments/

http://www.senseaboutscience.org/for_the_record.php/114/does-a-viral-gene-found-in-gm-food-raise-safety-concerns

http://www.independentsciencenews.org/commentaries/regulators-discover-a-hidden-viral-gene-in-commercial-gmo-crops/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/12/business/12seed.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

I Guess Wall Street Agrees: “Pursue an agriculture degree, and you’ll be rich.”

Because my real job as a financial advisor keeps me focused on the events going on in the world – currently the Tea Party gubbermint shutdown- I have to read these crazy financial websites.  As I’ve said previously, if you want to know what the citiots and wealthy are saying to each other read financial websites and journals.  More often than not they seem entirely out of touch with reality, but in recent months there has been something of an undercurrent with respect to farming.  Many are trying to assert that the reason that folks should consider a career in farming is because we will need to feed 9 – 10 billion people in the next half century.  While that may be true, as my previous post asserts, we are probably going to be stupid enough to try to do that with energy, land, and capital intensive, industrial means.  This article though, and several others, are suggesting it as a way to avoid a potential collapse.  Some are bold enough to say it directly, this one a little less so, but the subtler message seems to be, “something is bleeped up”, we all need food, there are not going to be a lot of industrial jobs, Wall Street is coming unhinged, and we are running out of everything (a recent financial post suggested that MIT’s Limits To Growth  – that we are going to essentially run out of most resources by 2030 – is spot on

{  http://www.cnbc.com/id/101051828   }  ).  The headline screamed that CEO’s and industry leaders were trying to figure out how to keep our infinite growth model going by improvements in technology and magic.

This quiet paradigm shift to agriculture, I think, speaks volumes.  No one wants to wake up the frogs in the warming pots of water.  They are whispering that the writing is on the walls and if you want to survive, you better have 1. the ability to support and feed yourself, and/or 2. have skills (like doctors and vets and general contractors and repair specialists and seamstresses, and all manner of homesteading skills) that others will need and can be used to support you.

For those who have not heard of them or not read them from my bibliography posted on JAZFarm blog,  I would strongly suggest the novel, “A World Made By Hand” by James Howard Kunstler or his more serious book, “The Long Emergency”.  Another would be,  “Peak Everything” by Richard Heinberg of the Post Carbon Institute.  You may want to subscribe to Peak Moment TV on the web (or watch their videos on You Tube).

Suffice it to say that if the citiots, the greedy, and the hard and fast believers in pure “capitalism” (whatever that really is) are talking about digging in the dirt……..   someone is waking up.  Get ahead of them, grow things, learn skills and more importantly….. make sure your kids do.  After this recent shutdown BS going on in Washington, a truism is that they will not be there to help you.  Create community, bring your family close, grow your own food, get in shape, get some callouses on your hands, buy good boots, and get busy.  Remember, there is no such thing as a plant that grows Pizza, Burgers and fries.  Wheat, potatoes, lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, corn, beans, spinach, onions, garlic, etc. all of these can be turned to pizza and beer and things much better and tastier!  Learn how to preserve food, how to grow year round even in winter, raise backyard chickens, and turn your neighborhood into a collective farm.  Learn to compost:  Turn REAL BS into compost, and use it to grow something useful.  Verbal BS simply raises the blood-pressure.

The fight being set up between this post and my last about losing 100,000 farmers by 2020, will be between those that want to control the land and those who will NEED the land.  The rest of our lives are setting up to be pretty interesting.

Jim Rogers: Skip the MBA, get an agriculture degree

Jim Rogers: Skip the MBA, get an agriculture degree

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Published: Friday, 4 Oct 2013 | 9:55 AM ET

By:  | CNBC Producer

Jim Rogers believes the finance industry is about to slip into secular decline. That’s why the famed investor advises young people to pursue careers in farming rather than in finance.

“If you’ve got young people who don’t know what to do, I’d urge them not to get MBAs, but to get agriculture degrees,” Rogers told CNBC.com.

David Jones | E+ | Getty Images

That’s because the financial commentator and author of “Street Smarts: Adventures on the Road and in the Markets” is bearish about the entire financial field.

“Finance has been good the past 30 years, but it was not good the 30 years before that, and it’s happening again,” Rogers said. “Finance is in decline. In the future, the center of the world will not be finance—it’s going to be the producers of real goods.”

Economist Robert Shiller recently raised the related question of whether the “best and the brightest” are doing to the world a disservice by going into finance. In a September column in Project Syndicate, the Yale economics professor asked: “Are too many of our most talented people choosing career in finance—and, more specifically, in trading, speculating, and other allegedly ‘unproductive’ activities?”

(Read moreWant to get an MBA? So do a lot of others)

Play Video
Rogers: ‘I Know It’s Going to End Badly’
Investor Jim Rogers explains why he’s not investing in U.S. stocks right now.

After all, there is a good argument that the agriculture field will present more compelling problems to solve.

“We are going to be trying to feed 9 billion people by 2050 with the same number of acres of arable land,” said Timothy Burcham, dean of agriculture and technology at Arkansas State University. Calling that task “overwhelming,” Burcham notes that “the opportunities for a person that has a graduate degree in agriculture are great now, but they are going to be really, really excellent going into the future.”

Rogers is factoring the expected rise of the agriculture industry into his investing thesis. “Recently, I’ve been looking at agriculture stocks,” Rogers said. “I’ve been excited about looking for things to buy in agriculture.”

(Read moreFarming equipment: Agriculture gets its own ‘Apple v. Windows’ battle)

And in a late Wednesday telephone interview from Singapore, Rogers’ prediction even took on a personal tone. He advised this writer: “Pursue an agriculture degree, and you’ll be rich.”

—By CNBC’s Alex RosenbergFollow him on Twitter: @CNBCAlex.

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This is Very Bad News

WE HAVE INDEED LOST OUR MINDS!!!  IF THIS IS INDEED TRUE THAT WE ARE GOING TO LOSE CLOSE TO 100,000 FARMERS AND RANCHERS BY 2020 OUR MORAL COMPASS HAS INDEED BEEN BROKEN.  THIS MEANS DIRECTLY THAT THE DIRECTION IN AGRICULTURE POLICY WILL BE TO MORE BURNING OF FUEL, MORE IMPORTS, LOSS OF TOPSOIL, LOSS OF DIVERSITY, LOSS OF SPECIES, LOSS OF TRADITION AND KNOWLEDGE…. IN SHORT… THE END.  WE ARE EXPECTED TO RUN OUT OF PHOSPHOROUS BY 2020, A KEY COMPONENT OF INDUSTRIAL FERTILIZER…. THEN WHAT?  AMMONIA BASED FERTILIZER IS LARGELY BASED ON NATURAL GAS AND THAT IS IN DECLINE.  THEN WHAT?  WE ARE APPROACHING PEAK OIL SO SHIPPING FOOD FROM OVER SEAS (ONE OF THE BIGGEST PRODUCERS OF LETTUCE – OF ALL THINGS – IS PRODUCED BY CHINA!)  THEN WHAT?  A REPORT WAS PUBLISHED ON CNBC RECENTLY THAT SAID THE WORLD WILL BE TAPPED OUT OF RESOURCES BY 2030!!  RIGHT IN LINE WITH MIT’S LIMITS TO GROWTH…. THEN WHAT?
 
ANSWER:  WE NEED TO REVERSE THIS TREND.  WE NEED TO PUT PEOPLE BACK ON THE LAND AND TEACH THEM HOW TO GROW FOOD, WE NEED TO ENGAGE IN ROTATIONAL GRAZING, ORGANIC SOIL BUILDING AGRICULTURAL PRINCIPLES AND DE – URBANIZE OUR LANDSCAPE!!!  SUBURBIA IS THE BIGGEST WASTE OF RESOURCES IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD!!  WHAT WOULD YOU DO, IF YOUR CITY COULDN’T GET FOOD TO IT?  THINK ABOUT IT….. THIS IS REALLY BAD.

Is Your Job About to Become Career Roadkill?

Seven Jobs That Might Disappear Soon

By Dona DeZube, Monster Finance Careers Expert

You don’t need a crystal ball to know that in the not-too-distant future, advances in technology and changing consumer preferences will crush the careers of some people who are very happily employed at this very moment. You can just look at Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data.

If you’re in one of these seven shrinking jobs, you can either start looking now for a way to transfer your skills and knowledge into a new job, or tough it out and hope the guy next to you gets the ax instead of you:

Gaming Cage Workers

Even though there’s probably a new casino opening near you, demand for gaming cage workers is actually expected to decline by an unlucky 13 percent between 2010 and 2020, the BLS says.

Since gamblers are using self-service machines to buy and cash in chips instead of going to your cage, a better bet for your career is in a field with a more optimistic employment outlook: healthcare. A community-college course in medical billing should help you learn the medical terms you’ll need to know to land a job as a billing clerk — a field projected to grow 20 percent by 2020, according to the BLS.

Auto Insurance Claims Adjusters

Cars are getting safer, which is good news for drivers, but bad news for auto insurance claims adjusters who have fewer accident claims to work. The BLS projects an 8 percent decline in jobs for auto claims adjusters between 2010 and 2020.

If you believe global climate change will lead to a continued uptick in natural disasters, a shift into property and casualty claims adjusting might be a good move for you. Look for opportunities to cross-train via your current employer, or seek out online or community-college classes to pick up knowledge of other insurance lines and the industry’s popular software programs.

You can also boost your employability as a property and casualty adjuster by picking up a bachelor’s degree in a related field like engineering or construction, or by acquiring knowledge of a specialty insurance niche like green building or art.

Floral Designers

Every time you buy flowers in the grocery store instead of ordering an arrangement from a florist, you contribute to the decline in demand for floral designers.

With the industry projected to lose 6,200 jobs between 2010 and 2020, up the chances of hanging on to yours by staying abreast of current trends, earning industry certifications and expanding your skill set intospecial-events coordination, says Thomas Shaner, executive director of the American Institute of Floral Designers. You could also consider teaching flower-arranging classes to all those people buying cut flowers.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Farmers !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Between 2010 and 2020, some 96,100 farmers and ranchers will go out of business, the BLS says. “As land, machinery, seed, and chemicals become more expensive, only well-capitalized farmers and corporations will be able to buy many of the farms that become available,” the BLS predicts. “These larger, more productive farms are better able to withstand the adverse effects of climate and price fluctuations on farm output and income.”

Farmers can either fight ‘em by niche marketing (think organic produce grown for local restaurants) or join ‘em by moving into farm management for an agribusiness corporation or, for those who like the business side of farming, agriculture consulting. If you’re up for a completely new career, consider agricultural appraising, says Cheryl L. Cooley, communications manager for the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers.

Power Plant Operators

If you turn off the lights when you leave the room, you’re killing jobs. Along with energy efficiency, new power plants requiring fewer employees to run them will lead to a 3 percent decline in the number of power plant operator jobs between 2010 and 2020, the BLS says.

You can try to switch over to water plant management, but the pay over there is worse (the annual median salary for water plant operators is $41,780 compared with $65,280 for power plant operators). Nuclear power plants are where the money is ($76,590 median annual salary), and new nuclear power facilities have gained approval.

Loan Interviewers and Clerks

Need a mortgage? There’s an app for that, and it’s putting loan interviewers and clerks out of work. The BLS projects a decline of 5,700 jobs for loan interviewers and clerks between 2010 and 2020.

With the real estate market on the upswing, a move into real estate sales might work if you can afford to live off your savings while you establish your real estate business.

The same skill set you use in collecting and analyzing would-be borrowers’ financial information would also come in handy at an IRS job, while your sales skills could apply in an insurance sales job.

Semiconductor Processors and Electronic Equipment Assemblers

You can blame it on the robots, efficiency experts or offshoring, but whichever you choose, there are still going to be 14,200 jobs gone from these two fields between 2010 and 2020, the BLS says.

Cover your assets by switching into an assembly job or fabrication job in a more prosperous sector ofmanufacturing, like aircraft products and parts. If you can handle the math, go back to school for an associate’s degree and become an electronic engineering technician. Not only will you be more employable, but you’ll boost your paycheck as well. The median salary for electrical and electronics engineering technicians is $56,900, according to the BLS.

Finally This Sees the Light of Day!!!

Its been a while since I’ve posted much new.  As many of you know, northern Colorado got hammered with a 100 year storm.  We have been keeping a vigil on things and keeping in communication with clients and friends who weren’t as lucky as we were and have sustained severe flooding.  We wish them all the best and hope that this isn’t a portend of things to come.

The fear currently, as some of these flood waters start to subside is just how extensive the damage is to all of the 1000’s of fracking wells in Weld County.  The report right now is that at least one storage tank has ruptured and sent over 5000 gallons of crude oil down the South Platte river.  I certainly hope that this kind of damage is minimized and that we don’t have to deal with the pollution of ground water, ill health, and general mess involved with uncontained, unconstrained oil.

On a more positive note I ran across an article that actually is bringing a very serious issue to light.  My doctor friends and I have often talked about how the CDC (Center for Disease Control) has repeatedly issued statements indicating how antibiotics are being rendered ineffective due to their overuse.  Most of the statements were admonitions to physicians to not over prescribe these drugs, as though the use of them on humans was the cause of this problem.  Never mentioned was the fact that 70% of the anti-biotic use in this country is used on animals!  Sub-therapeutic administering of antibiotics on animals raised in concentrated feeding facilities is releasing tons of these things into the environment through consumption of treated meat and their leaching into our drinking water.  None of this seemed to be addressed.  Big Ag is intensely powerful and it would come as no surprise if there influence over the USDA, the FDA, and the CDC would keep this from getting out.  Cudo to the reporter who finally brought this to light.  Sunshine is a great sanitizer.  Here is hoping that this has some influence in policy decisions going forward.

BAN CAFO’s!!!     Occupy the Food Supply!!!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/19/antibiotic-resistance-in-meat-cdc_n_3953938.html

From HandPicked Nation

This article appeared on the website/blog HandPicked Nation.  This is why The JAZFarm exists.  The disconnect between the Citiots and the world that supports them is indeed stunning.  You can walk practically any park or golf course and the only plants are a few trees and a field of grass.  The frogs slowly heating in the pan of water are the most oblivious the bigger the numbers on their balance sheets.  The meek may inherit the earth…. but those who know how to grow food will make that same earth worth living on.  Buy Locally Grown or Raise Your Own!!!

Vintage HandPicked: Joel Salatin’s Tyrant Neighbor

August 26, 2013

Joel Salatin

Joel Salatin › Joel Salatin is a full-time farmer in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

j_salatin

Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared on HandPicked Nation in May 2012. Like most of what Joel Salatin says, we think it bears repeating.

“What are you doing here?” the neighbor demanded, elbowing her way through the cluster of Polyface customers surrounding our delivery vehicle. “You can’t do this!” she remonstrated, into the face of her dumbfounded neighbor who was in the middle of filling her cooler with pastured chickens and “salad bar” beef.

Citing homeowners association rules and regulations about solicitations and commerce, this neighbor was hot and bothered about a local food drop occurring in her community. The very idea. Tsk. Tsk. I suppose she never receives a UPS shipment. I’m sure she’s never hosted a bridal shower or Tupperware party.

What’s the difference between a group of friends getting together to play games and the same group getting together to pick up their local food order? The face of local food has many expressions: farmers markets, community supported agriculture, buying clubs, home delivery, office delivery. It doesn’t look like a supermarket, that’s for sure.

Innovation on this ragged edge of the local food distribution network creates nuances that don’t fit neatly into zoning and other regulatory definitions. These folks clustered around our delivery vehicle had ordered their food online and were simply meeting the delivery vehicle at an appointed place. We (the farmers) were not soliciting sales, not selling anything. It had already been sold. Just like a UPS delivery. If we had used a lot more time and petroleum to deliver to each household customer, it would not have attracted attention.

“I’ve noticed that the wealthier the community the more the people who live there seem disconnected from their ecological moorings.”

But because we (the farmers) were trying to be efficient and set up a food fellowship-shindig-social setting as well, the convergence attracted attention and raised the ire of a prudish neighbor.

Rather than appreciating the food connections and relationships being established, this neighbor was incensed that something was happening in her upscale neighborhood besides gardeners mowing the lawns, domestics cleaning the houses, and children either properly occupied with electronic entertainment inside or participating in off-site soccer games outside.

I’ve noticed that the wealthier the community the more the people who live there seem disconnected from their ecological moorings. Do they just assume that no matter how expensive energy becomes, they will always be the top feeders? Few things can be more environmentally reasonable than clothes lines, downspout rain catchments, gardens, backyard rabbits, chickens, and honey bees. But these elements smack of peasants, agrarianism, and self-reliance. Too many people think they’ve evolved to a higher level of sophistication than to be bothered by such drivel.

Just last week a city mayor confessed to me that she did not even have a kitchen in her home. Having just read Jared Diamond’s iconic Collapse, I’m struck by the aloof, disconnected spirit of too many people. Apparently some folks think we’ll be the first culture to extricate ourselves from these nasty ecological moorings. They think we’ll be able to forget about our dependency on earthworms, soil, water, and air. I suppose they think we’ll all sail off on a Star Trek space ship eating breakfast in a tablet, living in a world without diapers and decomposition.

The whole crux of the local food movement depends on transparency and relationships. Too many people are far more passionate about the latest belly button piercing in Hollywood celebrity culture than what will become flesh of their flesh and bone of their bone at 6 p.m. That is tragic.

Instead of threatening litigation over a group of local food connectors and the farmer who braves expressways to bring nutrient density to town, neighbors and regulators should applaud and encourage such connections.

With all the hoopla about local food in our culture, I never cease to be amazed at the new hurdles thrown up to derail and distract this movement. The whole notion of local food is such a foreign concept that many people can’t even fathom what it looks like. And yet this community imbedded, shindig-oriented, rag-tag confluence of friends and food predates tyrannical neighbors who think they’ve risen above menial life responsibilities like food and soil.

If homeowners associations were really progressive, they’d be offering staging areas for local food connections to occur rather than using their rules to eliminate food interfaces. At some point, people need to realize that if they aren’t part of the solution, they’re part of the problem. Now go meet your farmer and get real food.

This article originally appeared on flavormagazinevirginia.com. It is re-posted here with permission from the author.

Would your neighborhood support a local food drop?

Photo Credit:  Craig McCord

A Palestinian Poem

The Seed Keeper

Burn our land
burn our dreams
pour acid onto our songs cover with saw dust
the blood of our massacred people muffle with your technology the screams of all that is free, wild and indigenous. Destroy.

Destroy
our grass and soil
raze to the ground
every farm and every village our ancestors had built every tree, every home every book, every law
and all the equity and harmony.

Flatten with your bombs every valley; erase with your edicts our past
our literature; our metaphor Denude the forests
and the earth
till no insect,
no bird
no word
can find a place to hide.
Do that and more.
I do not fear your tyranny
I do not despair ever
for I guard one seed
a little live seed
That I shall safeguard
and plant again.

(Palestinian poem)