Garden Tour: Everything Has Recovered From The Cold.

Now that the plants have gotten themselves established and the sensitive ones have recovered from the cold May planting season, come see how things are doing!

Advertisements

5 comments on “Garden Tour: Everything Has Recovered From The Cold.

  1. tonytomeo says:

    Impressive. How many people does all that feed? It seems excessive. We do not grow many peppers because the nights do not stay warm here, but the few that we grow make more than enough peppers for fresh use. We could pickle and preserve peppers if we grew more, but we would not need as many as you have. It seems backward that it is warm enough for peppers, but not too warm for cabbage. I could do without the catnip.

    • aghippie says:

      Excessive? And no one said you needed to grow catnip. We can, dehydrate, root cellar and freeze lots of food. I don’t understand that comment. It seems as though you think this is some little hobby. We rely on this place. More people should be “excessive”. It seems it would solve a lot of problems. I’m sure there are many other blogs that would fit your requirements.

      • tonytomeo says:

        Oh, I don’t grow that sort of catnip. I wrote about it though, and why I dislike it so. It has gotten so ridiculous here, on so many levels. I resent the generalization that as a horticulturist in California, I MUST be growing that sort of catnip, as if citrus (trees) and rhododendrons are not worthy horticultural commodities. I also resent how those who have ridiculed and shamed those who smoke tobacco, for polluting the environment (this ‘is’ California), are the same who smoke that sort of catnip in public, with no regard for those who find the aroma to be so objectionable. I really do not care if people use it medicinally, but I do resent that they want to share it with the rest of society. Those who smoke tobacco are generally more polite and accommodating about it. https://tonytomeo.com/2018/10/24/horridculture-weed/
        We can and dehydrate a lot of food too, and freeze a little bit of it. We do not grow extra to put much more than onions, root vegetables and pommme fruits into a cellar just because vegetables grow throughout the year here. The garden provides more than we can store. We only purchase a few vegetables that we do not grow, not because we need to, but because we sometimes find something that we want, but that we lack in the garden. For example, I sometimes purchase corn because it is so inexpensive, and because I do not want to give it the space and water in needs in the garden. Much of our surplus produce gets shared with neighbors. I know that if we had normal winters like everyone else gets, we would need to grow more during summer, but the system we use works for us here. Anyway, we do so with much less infrastructure. I know that much of the lack of infrastructure is because of the climate, but also, I prefer to grow things how they were grown here originally. It is bad enough that I must use so much infrastructure for the commodities that w We still work and grow horticultural commodities on the flat area, so lack the space for most types of livestock. The cattle left decades ago

      • tonytomeo says:

        Oh, I am sorry, I sent that before I finished it. That is why the last few sentences are all jumbled up. Anyway, you blog happens to be one of my favorites because it does not trivialize gardening and horticulture like so many of my clients do. I happen to enjoy living and working where I do, but it does get frustrating to see so many thinking that they are eating healthier because they grow a few tomatoes in some upside down contraption made of the same plastic that they blame big corporations for polluting the environment with. I can remember when there were still a few orchards in the Santa Clara Valley, and we thought nothing of it. Now a single unhappy lime tree in a pot on a balcony is something to brag about.

  2. tonytomeo says:

    Wow, it just got to the beets! Those are rad. It is probably my favorite for pickling, even more than cucumbers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s